Policy Insights

 
Welcome to our blog where we share ideas, insights and perspectives on migration policy and practice.

 

Lost in Categorisation – Smuggled and Trafficked Refugees and Migrants on the Balkan Route

07 June 2018

The approach of states to managing immigration and asylum relies to a significant extent on the assignment of categories to people entering from abroad. Yet many adults and children travelling along migration routes do not fit neatly into just one of these categories. A new ICMPD Working Paper examines the challenges, and some possible ways forward, in dealing with the nexus between asylum, migrant smuggling and human trafficking in mixed migration contexts.

The approach of states to managing immigration and asylum relies to a significant extent on the assignment of categories to people entering from abroad. Yet many adults and children travelling along migration routes do not fit neatly into just one of these categories. A new ICMPD Working Paper examines the challenges, and some possible ways forward, in dealing with the nexus between asylum, migrant smuggling and human trafficking in mixed migration contexts.

Negotiating the Common European Asylum System’s third generation – stubborn on vision, flexible on details…

30 May 2018

Only a few weeks left until the European Council’s imposed deadline for finding an agreement on the third generation of the CEAS will be due. At the centre of discussions, once more, is the Dublin proposal.

Only a few weeks left until the European Council’s imposed deadline for finding an agreement on the third generation of the CEAS will be due. At the centre of discussions, once more, is the Dublin proposal.

Free Movement in Africa - Time to Celebrate?

25 April 2018

On 29 January 2018 the AU adopted the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to Free Movement of Persons, Right of Residence and Establishment, and its Implementation Roadmap. The movement of people for work and trade is central to the AU’s mission of economic integration, which it views as a key pathway to development. The drive for the continental free movement of persons originates from the Organisation for African Unity Lagos Plan of Action for the Economic Development of Africa, 1980-2000, and is perpetuated by leading AU development instruments, including the Abuja Treaty, Agenda 2063, and the Continental Free Trade Area Agreement.

On 29 January 2018 the AU adopted the Protocol to the Treaty Establishing the African Economic Community Relating to Free Movement of Persons, Right of Residence and Establishment, and its Implementation Roadmap. The movement of people for work and trade is central to the AU’s mission of economic integration, which it views as a key pathway to development. The drive for the continental free movement of persons originates from the Organisation for African Unity Lagos Plan of Action for the Economic Development of Africa, 1980-2000, and is perpetuated by leading AU development instruments, including the Abuja Treaty, Agenda 2063, and the Continental Free Trade Area Agreement.

What remains 'common' in the “European Asylum System” if Dublin fails?

16 April 2018

Just recently, discussions on the future of the Dublin Regulation have come to a halt. The Bulgarian presidency reacted by installing an expert group to elaborate a zero draft on the future of the Dublin system. To recall, the Dublin Regulation is one of the core instruments of what is altogether referred to as the “Common European Asylum System (CEAS)”. All key CEAS instruments (the Asylum Procedures Directive, the Qualification Directive, the Reception Conditions Directive as well as the Regulation on the European Asylum Support Office (EASO)), are under discussion again along with the Dublin Regulation. The new legal framework shall find an agreement by the end of the Bulgarian presidency in June 2018.

Just recently, discussions on the future of the Dublin Regulation have come to a halt. The Bulgarian presidency reacted by installing an expert group to elaborate a zero draft on the future of the Dublin system. To recall, the Dublin Regulation is one of the core instruments of what is altogether referred to as the “Common European Asylum System (CEAS)”. All key CEAS instruments (the Asylum Procedures Directive, the Qualification Directive, the Reception Conditions Directive as well as the Regulation on the European Asylum Support Office (EASO)), are under discussion again along with the Dublin Regulation. The new legal framework shall find an agreement by the end of the Bulgarian presidency in June 2018.

Reporting on Trafficking in Human Beings

16 April 2018

Trafficking in human beings (THB) is a complex issue. At the heart of trafficking is the exploitation of one human being against their will by another, yet a large number of legal and social issues are linked with this process. As a result, trafficking can simultaneously be considered an organised crime challenge, a human rights violation, an issue linked with migration, labour market dynamics, gender or economic development. Each of these perspectives applies a different “narrative” to explain what human trafficking is and why it occurs. These different narratives sometimes present challenges for media professionals and journalists reporting on THB, and can lead to inaccurate or damaging representations of trafficking in the media.

Trafficking in human beings (THB) is a complex issue. At the heart of trafficking is the exploitation of one human being against their will by another, yet a large number of legal and social issues are linked with this process. As a result, trafficking can simultaneously be considered an organised crime challenge, a human rights violation, an issue linked with migration, labour market dynamics, gender or economic development. Each of these perspectives applies a different “narrative” to explain what human trafficking is and why it occurs. These different narratives sometimes present challenges for media professionals and journalists reporting on THB, and can lead to inaccurate or damaging representations of trafficking in the media.

Can complementary pathways live up to expectations?

14 November 2017

On 14 November 2017, UN Member States, intergovernmental organisations, representatives of civil society organisations and the private sector are coming together in Geneva for the fourth thematic discussion on the Global Compact on Refugees focusing on “measures to be taken in pursuit of solutions”.

On 14 November 2017, UN Member States, intergovernmental organisations, representatives of civil society organisations and the private sector are coming together in Geneva for the fourth thematic discussion on the Global Compact on Refugees focusing on “measures to be taken in pursuit of solutions”.

Are migrants and refugees a “vulnerable group” in the context of human trafficking?

18 October 2017

18 October 2017 is the 11th EU Anti-Trafficking Day. At ICMPD, we take this opportunity to analyse the linkages between migration, asylum and human trafficking, to stress the importance of the distinctions between human trafficking and migrant smuggling, and to address the vulnerabilities of migrants and refugees to trafficking.

18 October 2017 is the 11th EU Anti-Trafficking Day. At ICMPD, we take this opportunity to analyse the linkages between migration, asylum and human trafficking, to stress the importance of the distinctions between human trafficking and migrant smuggling, and to address the vulnerabilities of migrants and refugees to trafficking.

Irregular migration and regular pathways: What we really should do

10 October 2017

On 12-13 October 2017, the global migration compact process continues in Geneva with the sixth informal thematic session on irregular migration and regular pathways, including decent work, labour mobility, and recognition of skills and qualifications. UN Member States, intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental and civil society actors will gather to collect input and recommendations on these topics to inform the development of the global compact on migration.

On 12-13 October 2017, the global migration compact process continues in Geneva with the sixth informal thematic session on irregular migration and regular pathways, including decent work, labour mobility, and recognition of skills and qualifications. UN Member States, intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental and civil society actors will gather to collect input and recommendations on these topics to inform the development of the global compact on migration.

Fighting Human Trafficking: Three Priorities for the UN Global Compact for Migration

05 September 2017

The United Nations and its Member States have committed to adopting a major agreement on international migration in 2018, the Global Compact for Migration. The worldwide consultation process to determine what this agreement should actually entail continues in Vienna this week with a thematic session on smuggling of migrants, trafficking in persons and contemporary forms of slavery, including appropriate identification, protection and assistance to migrants and trafficking victims. UN Member States, NGOs, the private sector and intergovernmental organisations, including ICMPD, will gather to give their input and recommendations, feeding into the drawing up of the Global Compact itself.

The United Nations and its Member States have committed to adopting a major agreement on international migration in 2018, the Global Compact for Migration. The worldwide consultation process to determine what this agreement should actually entail continues in Vienna this week with a thematic session on smuggling of migrants, trafficking in persons and contemporary forms of slavery, including appropriate identification, protection and assistance to migrants and trafficking victims. UN Member States, NGOs, the private sector and intergovernmental organisations, including ICMPD, will gather to give their input and recommendations, feeding into the drawing up of the Global Compact itself.

Counter-smuggling operations and protection: how can we marry the two?

04 September 2017

In this article we examine smuggling through the prism of protection, highlighting how counter-smuggling operations can better take into account human rights considerations into their approaches.

In this article we examine smuggling through the prism of protection, highlighting how counter-smuggling operations can better take into account human rights considerations into their approaches.

Driving the sustainable development agenda forward – the role of migrants and diasporas

21 July 2017

In this article, we feature concrete ways on how to promote migrants and diasporas contributions in countries of origin and residence, drawing on ICMPD’s longstanding work with migrants and diasporas and governments. We focus in particular on a holistic approach and real partnership as the foundations for effective engagement that reflects the needs of all segments of migrants and diasporas. The global compact on migration, but also the global compact on refugees, needs to follow the core principle of the Sustainable Development Agenda – leaving no one behind. Too often approaches that aim to promote the contributions of migrants and diasporas focus on the successful actors and disregard those in need.

In this article, we feature concrete ways on how to promote migrants and diasporas contributions in countries of origin and residence, drawing on ICMPD’s longstanding work with migrants and diasporas and governments. We focus in particular on a holistic approach and real partnership as the foundations for effective engagement that reflects the needs of all segments of migrants and diasporas. The global compact on migration, but also the global compact on refugees, needs to follow the core principle of the Sustainable Development Agenda – leaving no one behind. Too often approaches that aim to promote the contributions of migrants and diasporas focus on the successful actors and disregard those in need.

Past and current burden- and responsibility sharing and arrangements

10 July 2017

Suppose an expert in international protection is contacted by Adnan, a 38 year old Syrian man from Aleppo. He asks for advice and wants to know where to go in order to receive protection from persecution and the war in Syria. What should a migration expert suggest to Adnan? First of all, the borders to neighbouring countries Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey are almost completely closed. Therefore, in order to find refuge in any foreign country and to fulfil the refugee definition, a border needs to be crossed, and that needs to be done irregularly which may be dangerous itself. But which country provides promising prospects?

Suppose an expert in international protection is contacted by Adnan, a 38 year old Syrian man from Aleppo. He asks for advice and wants to know where to go in order to receive protection from persecution and the war in Syria. What should a migration expert suggest to Adnan? First of all, the borders to neighbouring countries Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey are almost completely closed. Therefore, in order to find refuge in any foreign country and to fulfil the refugee definition, a border needs to be crossed, and that needs to be done irregularly which may be dangerous itself. But which country provides promising prospects?

Crisis-driven mobility: What do migrants have to say?

22 May 2017

In this second article of the series, we feature practical examples of migrant experiences and stakeholder responses to human-made crises, drawing on key findings from recent research on migrants caught in situations of crisis around the globe. We focus in particular on migrant responses and migrant voices, as these are necessary to ensure a global compact that responds to the needs of all, and in particular those who are vulnerable to violence or exploitation in the context of a crisis.

In this second article of the series, we feature practical examples of migrant experiences and stakeholder responses to human-made crises, drawing on key findings from recent research on migrants caught in situations of crisis around the globe. We focus in particular on migrant responses and migrant voices, as these are necessary to ensure a global compact that responds to the needs of all, and in particular those who are vulnerable to violence or exploitation in the context of a crisis.

Cities as the 'centre stage' for combating discrimination and safeguarding human rights of migrants

09 May 2017

Following up on the first informal thematic session entitled “Human rights of all migrants, social inclusion, cohesion and all forms of discrimination, including racism, xenophobia and intolerance that took place 8-9 May in Geneva, we are featuring selected examples and illustrations in this blog. We feature selected local level examples and illustrations to offer inspiration and help inform the discussion and debate on how the global compact for migration can set out to address its commitments in the fields of human rights, social inclusion and cohesion, battling discrimination and intolerance.

Following up on the first informal thematic session entitled “Human rights of all migrants, social inclusion, cohesion and all forms of discrimination, including racism, xenophobia and intolerance that took place 8-9 May in Geneva, we are featuring selected examples and illustrations in this blog. We feature selected local level examples and illustrations to offer inspiration and help inform the discussion and debate on how the global compact for migration can set out to address its commitments in the fields of human rights, social inclusion and cohesion, battling discrimination and intolerance.

Lessons from a Migration Policy Crisis

03 November 2016

The surge in the number of refugees and migrants making their way to Europe in 2015 brought the weaknesses of the fragile European migration and protection system to the forefront and indeed led to a virtual collapse of some of its key components, such as the Dublin Regulation. This triggered a policy and political crisis within the European Union as Member States and European Commission found themselves in disagreement over how to effectively handle the situation.

The surge in the number of refugees and migrants making their way to Europe in 2015 brought the weaknesses of the fragile European migration and protection system to the forefront and indeed led to a virtual collapse of some of its key components, such as the Dublin Regulation. This triggered a policy and political crisis within the European Union as Member States and European Commission found themselves in disagreement over how to effectively handle the situation.

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